Covid Hot spots

Although the exact origin of the virus that causes Covid-19, SARS-CoV-2, is unknown, scientists believe that the disease is likely to appear when the virus that infects horseshoe bats spreads to humans. According to the study, human settlements, agricultural expansion, and animal husbandry have created favorable hot spots for bats that spread the coronavirus, and also created favorable conditions for the spread of diseases from flying mammals to humans.

Scientists believe that the disease may appear when the virus that infects horseshoe bats can enter humans through direct or indirect contact between wild animals and humans. Initial infection of intermediate host animals such as pangolins. It is well known that horseshoe bats carry many coronaviruses, including strains that are genetically similar to the strains that cause COVID-19 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

A new study published in the journal Natural Food uses remote sensing to analyze the earth. Use specimens from the entire range of horseshoe bats that extend from Western Europe to Southeast Asia. Settlements, agriculture and animal husbandry, and compared them with the famous horseshoe bat habitat. They were able to identify potential hot spots where these bat species have favorable habitats and where these so-called zoonotic viruses can jump off bats.

Researchers have found that most of today’s hot spots are concentrated in China, where the growing demand for meat products has promoted the expansion of large-scale industrialized livestock production. The researchers also identified locations that could easily become hot spots as land use changes. They found that Japan, northern Philippines, and parts of China south of Shanghai are at risk of becoming hot spots due to increased forest fragmentation, while parts of Indochina and Thailand may become hot spots due to increased livestock production. Experts can surrender “universal” species that do not require high habitat.

Horseshoe bats are a versatile species, often found in areas affected by humans. The research team’s previous work has linked the fragmentation of forests and habitat destruction in Africa to the Ebola epidemic.

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