Huda Katem eagerly awaits his feedback on his first novel, which has been verified by the Iraqi Kurdish Book Club Erbil, in which young writers have injected hundreds of years New life of oral culture.

A 17-year-old medical novice told AFP: “This is the first review of my book.” He said: “I have learned a lot about how to improve writing and storytelling,” he added. The comments of writers, readers and professors provided him with “huge support”. The first novel by the young writer Barani Marg (Deadly Rain) is a children’s book. It tells the story of a Kurdish boy who escaped from a broken house at the age of 15 and joined the army. This is a familiar story for many residents in the autonomous region of northern Iraq, a country that has suffered from decades of conflict.

In the past few months, eight book clubs have sprung up in Kurdistan dedicated to providing a platform for local writers and regularly discussing narratives. The writer Goran Sabah first opened a book club in a coffee shop in Erbil in January. Sabah Education Institute holds a PhD in journalism from the University of Kansas. He said that the school has created generations of people who will “face youth poverty, rising unemployment and deep-rooted conservatism” and gain the confidence to change society.Sabah added: “Some young people watch football in order to avoid this reality, while others read novels and books.” Kurdish teacher and member of the Sabah club Bakhtiyar Farouk agreed. They went through this process and briefly forgot their cruel reality. Farouk said that the Iraqi passport does not open many doors, so many Iraqis “read novels for travel.” “We can visit Paris in our imagination. The two main dialects of Iraq are Solani and Kurman. The Kurdish literature published by Kyrgyzstan is rarely translated.

Sometimes, the books are published in Arabic, Persian or Turkish, and are mainly read by Kurdish people in neighboring countries. They speak different dialects and push Kurdish literature to “lack of political will” He said: “Many countries are providing funds to show their literary works to the outside world, but we have not yet done so.

There are also two novels in Danish, English and Persian. Alan Pari, founder and translator of Nusyar, said: “It is extremely difficult and expensive to translate the world and introduce Kurdish literature, but it is a dream, and we hope to realize this dream.” Nusyar ) One of the two novels promoted was Sabah’s science fiction, which the latter said was the first of its kind in Kurdish. “Life Terminator” involves suicide, which is a very strict taboo, but this taboo is becoming more and more common. The action took place in 2100. And after the first batch of 500 books are released in late February, they can be printed.

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