Goodbye Calibri. This is 2021, and it may not be the year when Times New Roman returns or Comic Sans takes over, but Microsoft’s default fonts are definitely changing. Starting in 2007, when replacing Times New Roman in Microsoft Office, the default fonts of all Microsoft elements will be deleted.

Microsoft wrote in its blog: “It serves all of us, but we think it’s time to move forward.” Helping us move in a new direction: We ordered five original custom fonts, which will eventually replace Standard Calibri. We are very happy to share these new fonts with you and hope to receive your feedback,” they added. They have occupied a position in standard fonts for nearly 15 years, and now they have finally disappeared and are covered by five new sans-serif styles. Instead, they include traditional, modern, and modern.

Even inspired by German street and railway signs, they also began to collect feedback on these five new sources on their social media, and plan to make one of them in 2022 The new default Office font.

Tenorite has the general look of a traditional sans serif Workhorse (with a sans serif or dash at the end, such as Times New Roman), but the style is warmer and friendly. Elements such as large dots, accents, and punctuation make Tenorite easy to use Reading on a small screen, clear shapes and wide characters create a general feeling of openness.

Bierstadt is a precise and modern sans serif font inspired by Swiss fonts in the mid-20th century. Bierstadt is a universal font that expresses conciseness and rationality in an easy-to-read way, and is also very clear, with the tail emphasizing order and constraints. It is a “humanized” sans-serif font based on the traditional serif font shape. His strokes are modulated to form a sharp contrast between roughness and subtlety, and many strokes have unique nicks at the end.

Keena is ideal for copying text in long documents and short paragraphs that often appear in presentations, brochures, spreadsheets, and reports. Seaford is a sans serif font, which originated from the old style serif font design and is very familiar. Asymmetrical shapes help reading by emphasizing the differences between letters, thereby creating more easily recognizable word shapes.

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